Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

End of Year Party today (06/06) at 3:30

All are invited to the Department’s annual End-of-the-Year Party today, Friday, June 6 from 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm in the Linguistics Courtyard between MJH & Psychology.

Drinks & snacks will be provided! We hope to see you there…

Please come to the Greenberg Room FIRST, promptly at 3:15, for a brief unveiling!

Phonology Workshop Meeting Today (06/06) at Noon: Lindsey

Come on by the Greenberg Room this Friday at noon for the last P-interest talk of the year! Our very own Kate Lindsey will be giving a talk about:

The Long and Short of Chuvash Suffixation: a preliminary analysis of Compensatory Lengthening and Vowel Elision

Kate will be doing fieldwork this summer to test her hypotheses and all feedback is welcome.

Socio talk today (06/06) at 1:30 PM: Levon

Erez Levon (Queen Mary, University of London) will be giving a talk today from 1:30-3:00 in the Greenberg Room.

Conflicted selves: Language, religion and same-sex desire in Israel

Abstract: A central tenet of recent sociolinguistic theorizing is the belief that individual subjectivity – and hence observed social and linguistic practice – results from the intersection of multiple potentially conflicting identifications (e.g., Cameron & Kulick 2003; Bucholtz & Hall 2005; Kulick 2005). In this talk I focus on the issue of identificational conflict and, in particular, how it gets materialized through language. My discussion is based on a case study of the intersection of sexuality and religion in Israel. Data are drawn from an interview I conducted with an informant I call Igal, a forty year-old Orthodox Jewish man who is married, has children, and also engages in sexual and romantic relationships with other men. I focus in my discussion on Igal’s use of creaky voice throughout the interview. Based on a quantitative and qualitative analysis of topic-conditioned style shifting (e.g., Schilling-Estes 2004; Coupland 2007), I argue that Igal uses creaky voice as a way of negotiating the conflict between his sexual and religious identifications. More specifically, I propose that Igal uses creaky voice in order to adopt a particular deontic stance (Shoaps 2004) through which he reaffirms a commitment to Jewish laws and customs despite the transgression of these laws that his identification with same-sex desire represents. I argue that in doing so Igal is able to orient to both of his conflicting identifications simultaneously, and in effect construct what Halbertal & Koren (2006) term a ‘multidimensional understanding of self.’ In the talk, I discuss the implications of this analysis for our understandings of the social meaning of creaky voice and of the relationship between language, stance and subjectivity more broadly.

AllNatural Workshop Meeting Wednesday (6/11) at 11AM: BIUTEE

The AllNatural workshop is departing from its usual schedule this week. Instead of this Friday, its next meeting will be next Wednesday, 6/11 at 11am. Natalia will be describing the BIUTEE system.

3rd CSLI Workshop on Logic, Rationality, and Intelligent Interaction This Weekend

The 3rd CSLI Workshop on Logic, Rationality and Intelligent Interaction is coming up May 31-June 1 in Cordura Hall.

This workshop continues a long-standing tradition at Stanford of annual outreach meetings in logic, broadly conceived, aimed at fostering discussion across disciplines and universities, with the added goal of involving both junior and senior participants. The content of the workshop is drawn from the disciplines of logic, philosophy, mathematics, computer science, linguistics and economics, with an emphasis on exploring contacts.

We hope to see you there! A finalized schedule with further information can be found here.

Dissertation Oral Presentation: Geenberg

The Department of Linguistics is pleased to announce a dissertation oral presentation:

The Other California: Marginalization and Variation in Trinity County

Kate Geenberg

Friday, May 30, 2014, 8am-9:15am
Margaret Jacks Hall, Rm 126

Little is known about English in the American West, especially in the region’s vast rural areas. And while popular stereotypes of the Sunshine State focus on easy living in California’s urban centers—San Francisco and Los Angeles—much of California is, in fact, both poor and sparsely populated. My dissertation is an ethnographic analysis of language variation in that Other California.

Trinity County is about the size of Vermont, but it is home to less than 14,000 people. And as Trinity County is far more rural than San Francisco County, rurality is recursive within the county, too. The well-funded county seat of Weaverville (pop. 3,600) is growing more bourgeois, while the next biggest town, Hayfork (pop. 2,386), is more dominated by survivalists than ever—largely due to the bourgeoning marijuana industry that’s taken root there.

As urban and (sub)urban lifestyles are in competition in the county today, so are rural- and urban-associated linguistic features. Southern- and Midlands- derived features, likely (re)introduced to California during the Dust Bowl migration, co-exist with urban California features in Trinity County today. I show that the pin-penmerger (a feature canonically associated with the South) and lessened participation in the Northern California Vowel Shift (previously documented in larger cities) are more common in Hayfork. These features are also more common in the speech of Trinitarians’ with more outdoorsy, survivalist lifestyles—no matter where they live. Taken together, these analyses unpack what it means to be Country in California.

Oral exam committee: Penny Eckert and John Rickford (Co-advisors), Rob Podesva, Tom Wasow
University oral exam chair: Ray McDermott (Education)

Sociolunch Wednesday 6/04 at 11:30: Stuart-Smith

Jane Stuart-Smith (University of Glasgow) will be talking during this week’s Sociolunch (Wednesday, June 4, Greenberg Room, 11:30-1).

No longer an elephant in the room: The influence of broadcast media on sound change in Scottish English

Abstract: In her brief critical paper on sociolinguistic theory, Eckert (2003) included the influence of the media on core aspects of language as an ‘elephant in the room’, a notion which is effectively ignored but at the same time seems to be present. In this talk, I will discuss the results of the first systematic, long-term sociolinguistic study of the possible influence of television on language variation and change, in the accent of Scotland’s largest city, Glasgow. I will outline several aspects of the study which together help draw a picture of the role of TV in the rapid spread of some consonant changes which are typically associated with dialects of Southern England:
(1) 1. The nature and spread of the changes in Glaswegian English, within the context of other variation and change in the city

(2) 2. A comparison of the consonant features as found in Glaswegian and in the speech of characters in the highly popular TV soap drama, EastEnders, set in London

(3) 3. The results of the large-scale statistical study which identified the key linguistic and social factors in these changes, including strong psychological engagement with EastEnders

(4) 4. The role of innovative individuals in these sound changes in Glasgow

These results strongly suggest that broadcast media are involved in accelerating these features in Glasgow. But some interesting details along the way also point to how this might happen, and I conclude by considering possible modelling of media influence on speech.

All are welcome!

Special Presentation Next Friday 6/6 at 1:30PM: Levon

Erez Levon (Queen Mary, University of London) will be giving a talk on Friday, June 6, 1:30-3:00 PM, in the Greenberg Room. The talk title and abstract are below:

Conflicted selves: Language, religion and same-sex desire in Israel

Abstract: A central tenet of recent sociolinguistic theorizing is the belief that individual subjectivity – and hence observed social and linguistic practice – results from the intersection of multiple potentially conflicting identifications (e.g., Cameron & Kulick 2003; Bucholtz & Hall 2005; Kulick 2005). In this talk I focus on the issue of identificational conflict and, in particular, how it gets materialized through language. My discussion is based on a case study of the intersection of sexuality and religion in Israel. Data are drawn from an interview I conducted with an informant I call Igal, a forty year-old Orthodox Jewish man who is married, has children, and also engages in sexual and romantic relationships with other men. I focus in my discussion on Igal’s use of creaky voice throughout the interview. Based on a quantitative and qualitative analysis of topic-conditioned style shifting (e.g., Schilling-Estes 2004; Coupland 2007), I argue that Igal uses creaky voice as a way of negotiating the conflict between his sexual and religious identifications. More specifically, I propose that Igal uses creaky voice in order to adopt a particular deontic stance (Shoaps 2004) through which he reaffirms a commitment to Jewish laws and customs despite the transgression of these laws that his identification with same-sex desire represents. I argue that in doing so Igal is able to orient to both of his conflicting identifications simultaneously, and in effect construct what Halbertal & Koren (2006) term a ‘multidimensional understanding of self.’ In the talk, I discuss the implications of this analysis for our understandings of the social meaning of creaky voice and of the relationship between language, stance and subjectivity more broadly.

All are welcome!