Archive for the ‘Groups’ Category

Voices of California Featured in Sacramento Bee!

The Voices of California project was recently featured in both The Sacramento Bee and The Sacramento Business Journal for its work to document Sacramentan speech.

VoC was also featured in the Daily Post in the article shown below:

Fieldwork Workshop Meetings for Fall

The Fieldwork Workshop will be hitting the ground running this quarter, holding group meetings on Tuesdays at 1:00 PM in the Ivan Sag room, starting the second week of classes (September 30).

At their first two meetings, you can hear from students who conducted fieldwork this summer!

Sept. 30: Sharese King, Daniel Galbraith, Ignacio Cases

October 7: Julia Fine, Kate Lindsey, and hopefully some fieldworkers from VoC Sacramento

Phonology Workshop Meeting Today (06/06) at Noon: Lindsey

Come on by the Greenberg Room this Friday at noon for the last P-interest talk of the year! Our very own Kate Lindsey will be giving a talk about:

The Long and Short of Chuvash Suffixation: a preliminary analysis of Compensatory Lengthening and Vowel Elision

Kate will be doing fieldwork this summer to test her hypotheses and all feedback is welcome.

Socio talk today (06/06) at 1:30 PM: Levon

Erez Levon (Queen Mary, University of London) will be giving a talk today from 1:30-3:00 in the Greenberg Room.

Conflicted selves: Language, religion and same-sex desire in Israel

Abstract: A central tenet of recent sociolinguistic theorizing is the belief that individual subjectivity – and hence observed social and linguistic practice – results from the intersection of multiple potentially conflicting identifications (e.g., Cameron & Kulick 2003; Bucholtz & Hall 2005; Kulick 2005). In this talk I focus on the issue of identificational conflict and, in particular, how it gets materialized through language. My discussion is based on a case study of the intersection of sexuality and religion in Israel. Data are drawn from an interview I conducted with an informant I call Igal, a forty year-old Orthodox Jewish man who is married, has children, and also engages in sexual and romantic relationships with other men. I focus in my discussion on Igal’s use of creaky voice throughout the interview. Based on a quantitative and qualitative analysis of topic-conditioned style shifting (e.g., Schilling-Estes 2004; Coupland 2007), I argue that Igal uses creaky voice as a way of negotiating the conflict between his sexual and religious identifications. More specifically, I propose that Igal uses creaky voice in order to adopt a particular deontic stance (Shoaps 2004) through which he reaffirms a commitment to Jewish laws and customs despite the transgression of these laws that his identification with same-sex desire represents. I argue that in doing so Igal is able to orient to both of his conflicting identifications simultaneously, and in effect construct what Halbertal & Koren (2006) term a ‘multidimensional understanding of self.’ In the talk, I discuss the implications of this analysis for our understandings of the social meaning of creaky voice and of the relationship between language, stance and subjectivity more broadly.

AllNatural Workshop Meeting Wednesday (6/11) at 11AM: BIUTEE

The AllNatural workshop is departing from its usual schedule this week. Instead of this Friday, its next meeting will be next Wednesday, 6/11 at 11am. Natalia will be describing the BIUTEE system.

Special Presentation Next Friday 6/6 at 1:30PM: Levon

Erez Levon (Queen Mary, University of London) will be giving a talk on Friday, June 6, 1:30-3:00 PM, in the Greenberg Room. The talk title and abstract are below:

Conflicted selves: Language, religion and same-sex desire in Israel

Abstract: A central tenet of recent sociolinguistic theorizing is the belief that individual subjectivity – and hence observed social and linguistic practice – results from the intersection of multiple potentially conflicting identifications (e.g., Cameron & Kulick 2003; Bucholtz & Hall 2005; Kulick 2005). In this talk I focus on the issue of identificational conflict and, in particular, how it gets materialized through language. My discussion is based on a case study of the intersection of sexuality and religion in Israel. Data are drawn from an interview I conducted with an informant I call Igal, a forty year-old Orthodox Jewish man who is married, has children, and also engages in sexual and romantic relationships with other men. I focus in my discussion on Igal’s use of creaky voice throughout the interview. Based on a quantitative and qualitative analysis of topic-conditioned style shifting (e.g., Schilling-Estes 2004; Coupland 2007), I argue that Igal uses creaky voice as a way of negotiating the conflict between his sexual and religious identifications. More specifically, I propose that Igal uses creaky voice in order to adopt a particular deontic stance (Shoaps 2004) through which he reaffirms a commitment to Jewish laws and customs despite the transgression of these laws that his identification with same-sex desire represents. I argue that in doing so Igal is able to orient to both of his conflicting identifications simultaneously, and in effect construct what Halbertal & Koren (2006) term a ‘multidimensional understanding of self.’ In the talk, I discuss the implications of this analysis for our understandings of the social meaning of creaky voice and of the relationship between language, stance and subjectivity more broadly.

All are welcome!

Voices of California Field Trip Set For Sacramento

This year’s Voices of California field trip will be to Sacramento September 2-17. All interested linguists are invited to join in – please let Penny know! The minimum stay is four consecutive days.

If anyone knows people living in Sacramento who could help the group learn about the community and recruit interviewees, let Penny know as soon as possible.

P-Interest Workshop Meeting Today (5/16) at Noon: Lin

Please join the P-Interest Workshop today at noon in the Greenberg Room, where Susan Lin (UC Berkeley) will be giving the following talk:

Place and manner of Kaytetye coronals

Abstract: What does it take to be coronal? In this talk, we explore the lingual articulations of coronal consonants in a language with an extensive inventory of coronal consonants — 4 manners at 4 places — using ultrasound imaging. We will consider the usual suspects, magnitude and location of primary constrictions, as well as temporal factors and the existence of secondary articulations.

Altogether, these data inform a discussion of how these consonants are produced by these speakers, confirming some of our intuitions, and calling into question some assumed generalizations (especially regarding the production of retroflex consonants).

SMircle Workshop Monday (5/19) at Noon: Sherley-Appel

Please join the SMircle Workshop, who will be joined by Clara Sherley-Appel (UCSC), who will be discussing the coordination of sub-words Monday at noon in the Greenberg Room.

The syntax of sublexical coordination

Abstract: Numerous languages exhibit what appears to be coordination at the sublexical level, as in pre- and post-modern art galleries. Such data are problematic for theories of morphosyntax which claim that word formation is not syntactic, since coordination is fundamentally syntactic. One approach to sublexical coordination argues that it is not syntactic coordination at all, but a distinct operation in the lexicon which resembles syntactic coordination only superficially. Proponents of this view observe that sublexical coordination seems to be more constrained than supralexical coordination, since not all affixes may be coordinated. I argue against this view, showing that sublexical coordination exhibits the same syntactic and semantic properties as coordination above the word, and showing that the restrictions on sublexical coordination are the reflexes of independently established prosodic, semantic, and pragmatic constraints.

Sociolunch Wednesday (5/21) at 11:30 AM: Hesson

Please join the Socio crew for Sociolunch, May 21, 11:30-1:00, in the Greenberg Room, where Ashley Hesson (Michigan State University) will be presenting.

Medically speaking: Mandative Adjective Extraposition in Physician Speech

Abstract: Clinical recommendations are central features of physician-patient interaction. Mandative adjective extraposition (henceforth MAE; Van Linden & Davidse 2009, Van Linden & Verstraete 2010) is one of many linguistic forms used by physicians in providing recommendations (e.g., it’s important to exercise, it’s critical that you take these pills). This study decomposes MAE, a relatively unexplored sociolinguistic variable, into features that contribute both to its pragmatic interpretation as a deontic semi-modal and its social interpretation in the context of physician-patient interaction. These features include MAE’s inherent, variable structural components—mandative adjective, complement type, embedded verb type, etc—as well as MAE’s suprasegmental hitchhikers (ala Mendoza-Denton 2011), such as intonational contours and creaky voice. The study considers the contributions of these features, in isolation and in concert, to physicians’ attempts at balancing their institutional and interpersonal goals when managing consultations. In doing so, it provides a base for understanding how doctors use clusters or layers of linguistic resources (Podesva 2008) to construct their professional personae.

Imperative force is proposed as the central dimension across which MAE forms vary and the object of MAE’s social/stylistic evaluation. In an experiment in which participants evaluated doctors’ recommendation style, some structural and suprasegmental features were perceived as ‘strong’ (i.e. were highly mandative) while others were perceived as ‘weak’ on a scale of imperative force. Strong forms were associated with perceptions of confidence and trustworthiness. Conversely, weak forms were viewed as markers of uncertainty. In particular, physician speech featuring rising intonation (one of the weak variants) was further judged to be apathetic.

Quantitative analysis was conducted on a large dataset (1,857 tokens) of physicians’ MAE-type recommendations. The recommendations were naturally-occurring productions from a US-wide corpus of audio-recorded, transcribed medical consultations (the Verilogue corpus; Kozloff & Barnett 2006). Strong and weak feature variants were found to consistently co-vary in this data, providing support for listeners’ intuitions in the perception experiment. Fittingly, strong forms were more likely to be employed by physicians in making recommendations to severely ill patients. Strong forms were also positively correlated with physicians’ years in practice, indicating that physicians may become more direct with experience. However, intriguingly, physicians with more years in practice were more likely to layer rising intonation onto their MAE forms. This suggests that physicians continue to negotiate their often competing goals of reinforcing expertise with direct, confident-sounding forms and mitigating said forms to meet interpersonal expectations, where semantic and syntactic resources become more central to the construction of authoritativeness over the professional lifespan. Within specific practice settings, based on either physician specialty or patient medical condition, MAE production was additionally constrained by patient race and physician gender, alluding to in-group professional pressures that further shape physician recommendation patterns.

The integrated production and production results collectively point to socialization into medical practice as the major social force impacting MAE variation. Medically relevant categories (e.g., specialty), classifications (e.g., disease severity), and experience are all shown to influence MAE variation in physician-patient interaction, where these factors represent concepts and social distinctions that are specific to the context of medicine. Physicians use strong MAE forms as one of many potential sociolinguistic resources in the construction of an authoritative (confident and trustworthy) professional persona, while using weak forms to construct situationally appropriate indirectness.

Overall, this work provides a novel approach to the study of variation in context. It explores stylistically meaningful variability within a single construction, examining patterns of use and perception that define the construction’s significance within a professionally constrained subset of transactional discourse. Moreover, it illustrates the value of cross-disciplinary applications of variationist methodology, quantifying and characterizing patterns of interest to both sociolinguistics and medicine.

3rd CSLI Workshop on Logic, Rationality and Intelligent Interaction

The 3rd CSLI Workshop on Logic, Rationality and Intelligent Interaction is coming up May 31-June 1 in Cordura Hall.

This workshop continues a long-standing tradition at Stanford of annual outreach meetings in logic, broadly conceived, aimed at fostering discussion across disciplines and universities, with the added goal of involving both junior and senior participants. The content of the workshop is drawn from the disciplines of logic, philosophy, mathematics, computer science, linguistics and economics, with an emphasis on exploring contacts.

We hope to see you there! A finalized schedule with further information can be found here.